Archive for the Recycling News Category

R3v3 Elevated to elite ranks of Approved National Standards!

SERI is proud to announce that with newly-released R2v3, the R2 Standard has taken another significant step forward by earning recognition by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and is now the only approved American National Standard for responsible electronics reuse and recycling.

Why is this important? Because if you believe in the process, you can trust the result. There are hundreds of thousands of standards in the world — some are strong, valid standards, but some are nothing more than pay-to-play schemes. How do you know the difference?

ANSI accreditation validates that the process of developing R2v3, which took more than 5 years and over 5100 volunteer hours from our multi-stakeholder TAC, meets their rigors for standards development. And the result is an R2v3 Standard that is at the same time independent and fully invested in creating positive change through responsible and sustainable electronics reuse and recycling.

Said Corey Dehmey, SERI’s Executive Director, “SERI has always been committed to an open, balanced, consensus-based process to develop the R2 Standard. The strength of R2 is that it is the stakeholders (the R2 TAC) that create and revise the R2 Standard, and that strength is reflected in R2’s overwhelming adoption by OEMs, businesses, governments, refurbishers, recyclers, ITAD providers, and warranty, returns, and trade-in programs.   Recognition as an Approved American National Standard verifies the credibility of the R2 Standard development process.”

Standards are voluntary and SERI is proud that more than 950 R2 Certified facilities in 33 countries have chosen to implement R2 and improve how the world reuses and recycles electronics.

Learn more about ANSI’s development process by viewing ANSI Essential Requirements: Due process requirements for American National Standards

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SERI – Sustainable Electronics Recycling International

Republic Services Provides Insight into Current Economic Conditions

The waste industry has proved to be resilient throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Republic Services CEO Don Slager told Michael E. Hoffman during the online Waste360/Stifel Investor Summit. As the novel coronavirus spread throughout the worl
Waste360 – Waste and recycling information, events, commerce and education

Walmart Suppliers Avoided 136 Million Metric Tons of Emissions

Walmart’s suppliers reported that they avoided 136 million metric tons of emissions last year alone, according to the retailer’s 2020 Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Report.

The post Walmart Suppliers Avoided 136 Million Metric Tons of Emissions appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader.

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Amazon Adding 1,800 Electric Mercedes-Benz Vans to European Fleet

Amazon announced it is adding more than 1,800 electric vehicles from Mercedes-Benz Vans to its delivery fleet in Europe this year.

The post Amazon Adding 1,800 Electric Mercedes-Benz Vans to European Fleet appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader.

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Report: $3.4 Trillion to be Invested Globally in Renewable Energy by 2030

According to a new report, an estimated $ 3.4 trillion will be invested in renewable energy during the next decade, including $ 2.72 trillion in wind and solar.

The post Report: $ 3.4 Trillion to be Invested Globally in Renewable Energy by 2030 appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader.

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Greentech Startups Battle Food Waste with Innovation

Three greentech startups are aiming to reduce the 1.3 billion tons of food that goes to waste and ends up in landfills each year. Australia-based Goterra's innovation is about to go global. The company's “fully self-contained, automated capsules” co
Waste360 – Waste and recycling information, events, commerce and education

Seeing slight shifts in municipal recycling programs

Seeing slight shifts in municipal recycling programs
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Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, several municipal recycling programs were suspended as a result earlier this spring and summer. In addition, bottle bill programs have been halted in some areas. Back in June, California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order that allowed grocers and retailers to choose if they would want to redeem bottles and cans or continue not to for a 60-day period.

Recycling Today connected with Will Sagar, executive director of the Southeast Recycling Development Council (SERDC), to learn about trends SERDC is noticing this year in municipal recycling programs.

Recycling Today (RT): Based on what you’ve noticed lately, how have municipal recycling programs been doing this sprint and summer? Has the pandemic had much of an impact on them?

Will Sagar (WS): The first obvious thing everybody saw was residential picked up and commercial collection dropped. That affected the supply chain. We saw increases in OCC (old corrugated container) prices. That price has since dropped back down, but it’s still stronger than we were at before, which is encouraging. So, that’s been good.

Plastic containers suffered and price has gone down, but that’s not just the supply picked up. The price of oil went down because of the lack of demand for gasoline. When petroleum went down, plastic prices went down. So, that was pandemic driven, but a bit more indirectly.

Then the other side of that, we lost some bottle deposit programs for a while. Eight out of 10 states removed the requirement that retailers needed to operate buyback programs. People with beverage containers could forego it or put it in regular recycling programs.

But probably the bigger thing we’re looking at is the financial strains that counties and cities have been facing and are going to face from their lost revenue—sales tax revenues are down, occupancy taxes … they will see lower collection rates by the end of the year. City budges will be under an awful lot of stress throughout this fiscal year. Our hope is they don’t look at recycling collection as some luxury add-on program; we work hard for recycling to be essential in a pandemic because we need this material for supply chain manufacturing. Recycling is a significant part of economic recoveries, but if we start by not operating collection, we run into significant obstacles on recovery. So, that concern is out there.

RT: We’ve noticed in the media that some municipal recycling programs were suspended due to COVID-19. Have you been tracking this lately?

WS: It’s hard to track programs being suspended. You try to keep the list up, but it’s a moving target and there’s no central hub. I would have discussions with some state agencies, and they weren’t necessarily aware if there were suspensions within their own states. It comes down to if local government suspends their program, they won’t do an annual report on what they did until this time next year. They don’t necessarily have to tell the state if they stopped collecting in a given month. So, there’s a lag in that reporting time for state agencies to know about it. Some state agencies have closer relationships with localities than others, and some programs we were picking up in the media that the state agencies weren’t aware of.

RT: Since the pandemic hit, have contamination levels changed at all?

WS: We’re conducting a MRF study right now and we asked that question. So far, most of them have said there’s been no difference—it’s about the same. [The only difference is there is more residential material than commercial material.] I would speculate that there is less of public space recycling going on, and that tends to be a higher contamination level source.

RT: What do you think may be long-term impacts of the pandemic on municipal recycling?

WS: It does look like whatever ‘normal’ used to be is probably not where we’re going to be a year from now. Even if we had a vaccine and infection rates were down, I think there will be a lot more working remotely, and I think along the way we’re probably picking up a strengthening of family values. We’ve stayed in our bubble more, making it more important to spend time with children and grandchildren. I think that will keep residential collection reasonably strong.

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Source: Recycling Today
Seeing slight shifts in municipal recycling programs
<![CDATA[Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, several municipal recycling programs were suspended as a result earlier this spring and summer. In addition, bottle bill programs have been halted in some areas. Back in June, California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order that allowed grocers and retailers to choose if they would want to redeem bottles and cans or continue not to for a 60-day period.Recycling Today connected with Will Sagar, executive director of the Southeast Recycling Development Council (SERDC), to learn about trends SERDC is noticing this year in municipal recycling programs.Recycling Today (RT): Based on what you’ve noticed lately, how have municipal recycling programs been doing this sprint and summer? Has the pandemic had much of an impact on them?Will Sagar (WS): The first obvious thing everybody saw was residential picked up and commercial collection dropped. That affected the supply chain. We saw increases in OCC (old corrugated container) prices. That price has since dropped back down, but it’s still stronger than we were at before, which is encouraging. So, that’s been good. Plastic containers suffered and price has gone down, but that’s not just the supply picked up. The price of oil went down because of…

Carolina Recycling Association

Organizations announce plastic recycling initiative

Organizations announce plastic recycling initiative
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Several nongovernmental organizations are spearheading an initiative called the United States Plastics Pact, which aims to make all plastic packaging 100 percent reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

The creation of the U.S. Plastics Pact has been jointly announced by The Recycling Partnership, based in Falls Church, Virginia; the United Kingdom-based Ellen MacArthur Foundation; and the Switzerland-based World Wildlife Fund. The pact was announced at an online event hosted by Oakland, California-based Greenbiz Circularity.

The groups call the pact “an ambitious initiative to unify more than 70 diverse public-private stakeholders – ‘Activators of The Pact’ – across each part of the supply and plastics manufacturing chain to rethink the way we design, use and reuse plastics in order to create a path toward a circular economy for plastic in the U.S.”

The pact has identified four targeted results:

  • to define a list of packaging to be designated as problematic or unnecessary by 2021, and to “take measures to eliminate them by 2025;” 
  • to ensure that by 2025, all plastic packaging is 100 percent reusable, recyclable, or compostable;
  • to undertake what the pact calls “ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50 percent of plastic packaging” by 2025; and
  • to reach an average recycled content or “responsibly sourced bio-based content” in plastic packaging of 30 percent by 2025.

The organizers of the U.S. Plastics Pact say it was created in part because “individualized action has proven insufficient thus far in achieving significant, systemwide change. Reaching this specific vision will require new levels of innovation and collaboration from all ‘activators’ of the U.S. Plastics Pact and beyond.”

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Source: Recycling Today
Organizations announce plastic recycling initiative
<![CDATA[Several nongovernmental organizations are spearheading an initiative called the United States Plastics Pact, which aims to make all plastic packaging 100 percent reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.The creation of the U.S. Plastics Pact has been jointly announced by The Recycling Partnership, based in Falls Church, Virginia; the United Kingdom-based Ellen MacArthur Foundation; and the Switzerland-based World Wildlife Fund. The pact was announced at an online event hosted by Oakland, California-based Greenbiz Circularity.The groups call the pact “an ambitious initiative to unify more than 70 diverse public-private stakeholders – ‘Activators of The Pact’ – across each part of the supply and plastics manufacturing chain to rethink the way we design, use and reuse plastics in order to create a path toward a circular economy for plastic in the U.S.”The pact has identified four targeted results:to define a list of packaging to be designated as problematic or unnecessary by 2021, and to “take measures to eliminate them by 2025;”  to ensure that by 2025, all plastic packaging is 100 percent reusable, recyclable, or compostable;to undertake what the pact calls “ambitious actions to effectively recycle or compost 50 percent of plastic packaging” by 2025; and to reach an average recycled content or…

Carolina Recycling Association

Major Retailers and Manufacturers Lead New Food Waste Action Coalition

The Consumer Goods Forum (CGF) united a group of 14 major retailers and manufacturers this week into a new coalition that aims to fight food waste, cutting global food loss in half per capita at both the retailer and consumer levels.

The post Major Retailers and Manufacturers Lead New Food Waste Action Coalition appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader.

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How Might We Transport Goods to Reduce Environmental Impact?

For decades, the single-use plastic bag reigned as the dominant design solution for getting a purchase home. But that popularity comes at a great cost. It’s estimated that we use 100 billion single-use plastic bags per year in the U.S. alone&nbs
Waste360 – Waste and recycling information, events, commerce and education