Archive for the Recycling News Category

R2 reuse requirements reduce environmental footprint and help emerging markets

Fundamental to the R2 Standard is the emphasis on reuse as the best approach to managing electronics.   Reuse extends the useful life of electronics, thereby, reducing the environmental impact of manufacturing new products.  In addition to the widely recognized environmental benefits, reuse also provides economic and social benefits by bridging the digital divide with affordable electronics – particularly in emerging markets.  In many regions of the world, the technology boom of the past decade has been fueled in large part by access to affordable used electronics. 

Under R2, reusable electronics can be fully functional, or they may have slight imperfections that do not affect the key functions of a device (such as a laptop with shortened battery life, or a cell phone that no longer takes pictures).  The R2 Standard maximizes the reuse of devices in both categories.   Provision 6.c.2 of the Standard requires that the key functions of all devices sold or donated for reuse must be working and tested, with test results recorded and verified.  If any secondary functions do not work, this must be disclosed to potential buyers.  Importantly, the testing must be done by a qualified technician – it is not simply a matter of “powering on” by a warehouse employee.  

R2 Provision 6.c.3 permits recyclers without the necessary internal technical resources to outsource testing and refurbishing to a qualified downstream vendor who meets the due diligence requirements of Provision 6.c.3 and 5.e.   However, in order to control the flow of untested and non-working equipment in the reuse market, the outsourced refurbisher is restricted from re-selling the equipment for reuse unless it has been tested and verified working.  If the equipment is not repairable it must be recycled – it may not be sold to another downstream refurbisher or broker. 

Bottom Line:  The R2 Standard creates a balance; maximizing reuse while imposing strict requirements regarding the testing and sale of used electronics.  This combination protects the environment and helps generate economic opportunity in emerging markets.  

 

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SERI – Sustainable Electronics Recycling International

Latest news stories from E-Scrap News: E-Scrap Academy returns at E-Scrap 2016

E-Scrap Academy returns at E-Scrap 2016

May 25, 2016

read more on Resource Recycling aggregator

Latest news stories from Resource Recycling: Scrap export numbers are all over the map

Scrap export numbers are all over the map

By Editorial Staff, Resource Recycling

May 24, 2016

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Are your electronics as sustainable as they claim? Five ways to be sure.

Before accepting any certification at face value, it’s important to understand what goes into it.
Environmental Leader

“Polluting” Recycling Company in Minn. May be Shut Down

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is working on revoking the air quality permit for Northern Metal Recycling.

read more on Waste360

Latest news stories from E-Scrap News: Tracking project leads to discussion over certification

Tracking project leads to discussion over certification

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

May 19, 2016

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Latest news stories from E-Scrap News: Processor opens facility to recover e-plastics

Processor opens facility to recover e-plastics

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 19, 2016

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Latest news stories from E-Scrap News: E-Scrap 2016: Outlining your path to profitability

E-Scrap 2016: Outlining your path to profitability

May 18, 2016

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“Curbing” Curbside Recycling Costs and Boosting Recovery

Getting Americans to recycle correctly remains a big challenge for the industry.

read more on Waste360

You probably have a drawer full of them – why can’t we crack battery recycling?

Research indicates up to half of all EU countries could fall short of this year’s target to recycle 45% of waste batteries

 

The directive forces manufacturers to cut their use of the most toxic battery ingredients, such as mercury and cadmium.

Continue reading…on Recycling | The Guardian

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