Archive for the Recycling News Category

Scientists Discover New Material That Could Capture 90% of CO2 Emitted from Industrial Sources

Scientists from ExxonMobil, University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have discovered a new material that could capture more than 90% of CO2 emitted from industrial sources.

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Report finds that plastic flow into oceans will triple by 2040 without immediate action

Report finds that plastic flow into oceans will triple by 2040 without immediate action
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New research by Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, and Systemiq, London, in the foundation for a new report, “Breaking the Plastic Wave: A comprehensive assessment of pathways towards stopping ocean plastic pollution.”

The report details the immediate actions needed to curb the amount of plastic waste entering the world’s oceans.

Winnie Lau, who has a doctorate in oceanography, with Pew who has spent years working in ocean conservation, worked on this research. She says it’s time to act for the sake of our planet.

“I think we all know the problem is bad, but we don’t fully appreciate how bad it could get,” Lau says. “So having these numbers, I think, really opens up the dialogue to have an honest, open debate about what we’re choosing.”

Without action, this research says the plastic entering the oceans will grow from 11 million metric tons to 29 million metric tons over the next two decades. Since plastic in oceans never biodegrades, the amount would weigh nearly 600 million tons, about the same as 3 million blue whales.

The research used a model to quantify the flow of plastic and determine the best ways to reduce it

Lau says this report highlights some of the ways to fix the issue that is realistic and still impactful. Current measures in place by the industry and governments will only reduce plastic in the ocean by about 7 percent.

Through this research, eight measures were found that can reduce plastic in oceans by 80 percent, including reducing plastic production and consumption, using paper instead of plastic where available, expanding waste collection in low-income countries and increasing recycling.

When it comes to recycling, the report offers a few solutions. Redesigning plastic packaging to either be plastic-free or only have 1 layer of plastic. Replacing single-use products like water bottles and plastic bags with items that can be reused. Refilling is another suggestion from this report. More subscription services that can refill plastic bottles instead of dispensing new ones.

The report also talks about goals of doubling of mechanical recycling capacity globally; scaling up collection rates in middle- and low-income countries; and reducing scrap exports to countries with low plastic scrap collection volumes of their own.

The American Chemistry Council (ACC), Washington, D.C., responded to the report, saying it agrees with the urgent need to invest in waste management infrastructure and reduce the use of unnecessary plastics.

ACC says according to a 2016 report prepared by Trucost (in collaboration with ACC), “replacing plastics in packaging and consumer products with alternative materials could raise environmental costs nearly fourfold, including through significant increases in greenhouse gas emissions.” 

America’s plastic makers are also looking to 2040, setting a goal for all plastic packaging used in the United States to be reused, recycled or recovered, ACC says. 

“I think 10, 15 years ago, the recognition that this was a problem was not as pervasive as it is today,” Lau says. Now that more people are aware, she says we are now at a good point to make conscious decisions to solve the problem.

Lau says it’s essential to solve this problem at scale. This is not something that can, or should, be fixed overnight. She says this report helps to show what areas need more focus immediately and what can be more long-term solutions.

“If everyone does put in 100 percent effort, I do think we’re on track to ending plastic pollution going into the ocean, into the environment,” Lau says. “I would say if society, if governments, businesses really do put their hearts and minds behind it, we can get to what we’re calling near-zero plastic pollution in the ocean.”

Going forward, she says even if people start their efforts today, the problem will get worse before it gets better. But she says that doesn’t mean we should wait, because the problem isn’t going away.

While this sounds like a costly mission to take on, not acting will actually cost more in the long run. If current trends continue, fixing this issue in 20 years will cost governments and the public $ 70 billion, according to the report.  

If people only take one thing away from this report, she says she hopes that it’s that the future of our planet is entirely in ours hands.

The Pew Charitable Trusts, founded in 1948, is a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization with the mission to serve the public interest by "improving public policy, informing the public, and invigorating civic life."

Systemiq is a systems change company that partners with business, finance, policymakers and civil society to make economic systems truly sustainable. 

To read that full report, click here.

 

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Source: Recycling Today
Report finds that plastic flow into oceans will triple by 2040 without immediate action
<![CDATA[New research by Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, and Systemiq, London, in the foundation for a new report, “Breaking the Plastic Wave: A comprehensive assessment of pathways towards stopping ocean plastic pollution.”The report details the immediate actions needed to curb the amount of plastic waste entering the world’s oceans. Winnie Lau, who has a doctorate in oceanography, with Pew who has spent years working in ocean conservation, worked on this research. She says it’s time to act for the sake of our planet. “I think we all know the problem is bad, but we don’t fully appreciate how bad it could get,” Lau says. “So having these numbers, I think, really opens up the dialogue to have an honest, open debate about what we’re choosing.”Without action, this research says the plastic entering the oceans will grow from 11 million metric tons to 29 million metric tons over the next two decades. Since plastic in oceans never biodegrades, the amount would weigh nearly 600 million tons, about the same as 3 million blue whales. The research used a model to quantify the flow of plastic and determine the best ways to reduce itLau says this report highlights some of the ways to…

Carolina Recycling Association

Mastercard Launches Sustainable Materials Program for Card Issuers

Mastercard developed a new sustainable card program for card issues globally aimed at reducing the amount of first-use polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic used for manufacturing cards. The company also introduced a directory of sustainable materials and vendors for financial institutions.

The post Mastercard Launches Sustainable Materials Program for Card Issuers appeared first on Environment + Energy Leader.

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Crude steel production declines 6 percent globally in the first half of 2020

Crude steel production declines 6 percent globally in the first half of 2020

Crude steel production declines 6 percent globally in the first half of 2020
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World crude steel production for the 64 countries reporting to the World Steel Association (Worldsteel), Brussels, was 148.3 million metric tons in June of this year, a 7 percent decrease compared with production in June 2019. However, many of the figures for June of this year are estimates that may be revised with next month’s production update in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the association says.

World crude steel production was 873.1 million metric tons in the first six months of 2020, down by 6 percent from the same period in 2019, according to Worldsteel. Asia produced 642 million metric tons of crude steel in the first half of 2020, 3 percent less than in the first half of 2019. The European Union produced 68.3 million metric tons of crude steel in the first half of 2020, 18.7 percent less than in the first half of 2019, while North America’s crude steel production in the first half of 2020 was 50.2 million metric tons, a decrease of 17.6 percent compared with the first half of 2019.

steel production chart

© Worldsteel
 

In June of this year, production in the Asia region, which Worldsteel defines as China, India, Japan, South Korea, Pakistan, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam, declined 2.3 percent compared with June of last year, while it declined 3 percent for the first half of the year. China produced 91.6 million metric tons of crude steel, or 4.5 percent more steel than it produced in June 2019. India produced 6.9 million metric tons of crude steel in June 2020, down 26.3 percent from June 2019. Japan produced 5.6 million metric tons of crude steel in June of this year, down 36.3 percent from June 2019. South Korea’s steel production for June was 5.1 million metric tons, a 14.3 decrease relative to June 2019. Vietnam posted a 13.4 percent increase in production, going from nearly 1.7 million metric tones in June 2019 to 1.92 million metric tons this June. For the first half of the year, that country saw its production increase 4.6 percent relative to the first half of 2019.

In the E.U., Germany produced 2.5 million metric tons of crude steel in June 2020, down 27.3 percent on June 2019, Worldsteel says. Italy produced 1.8 million metric of crude steel for the month, down 13 percent on June 2019. France and Spain each produced 0.8 million metric tons of crude steel in June 2020, down 34.9 percent and 31.5 percent, respectively, compared with June 2019.

In North America, steel production for June of this year declined 32.2 percent. The United States produced 4.7 million metric tons of crude steel in June 2020, a decrease of 34.5 percent compared with June 2019. For the first half of the year, the country’s steel production declined 182.3 percent from the same period in 2019, according to Worldsteel. Canada saw its production decline 30.8 percent for the month and 15.2 percent for the first half of the year, while Mexico’s declined 21.4 percent for the month and 15.8 percent for the half.

Production in the C.I.S. is estimated to be 7.9 million metric tons in June of this year, Worldsteel says, which is a decrease of 5 percent from June 2019. The region’s production declined 4.1 percent in the first half of the year compared with the same period in 2019. Ukraine produced 1.8 million metric tons of crude steel in June, which is 9 percent more than it made in June 2019; it’s half-year production decline 7.6 percent from 2019.

Turkey’s crude steel production for June was 2.8 million metric tons, up by 4.1 percent from June 2019. Through the first half of the year, the country produced 16.3 million metric tons of steel, 4.1 percent less than in the first half of 2019.

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Source: Recycling Today
Crude steel production declines 6 percent globally in the first half of 2020
<![CDATA[World crude steel production for the 64 countries reporting to the World Steel Association (Worldsteel), Brussels, was 148.3 million metric tons in June of this year, a 7 percent decrease compared with production in June 2019. However, many of the figures for June of this year are estimates that may be revised with next month’s production update in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the association says.World crude steel production was 873.1 million metric tons in the first six months of 2020, down by 6 percent from the same period in 2019, according to Worldsteel. Asia produced 642 million metric tons of crude steel in the first half of 2020, 3 percent less than in the first half of 2019. The European Union produced 68.3 million metric tons of crude steel in the first half of 2020, 18.7 percent less than in the first half of 2019, while North America’s crude steel production in the first half of 2020 was 50.2 million metric tons, a decrease of 17.6 percent compared with the first half of 2019.© Worldsteel In June of this year, production in the Asia region, which Worldsteel defines as China, India, Japan, South Korea, Pakistan, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam, declined…

Carolina Recycling Association

Apple commits to be 100 percent carbon neutral by 2030

Apple commits to be 100 percent carbon neutral by 2030
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Apple, based in Cupertino, California, announced plans to become completely carbon neutral in the next decade. It will be across the entire business with the goal of every Apple device having net zero climate impact.

“Businesses have a profound opportunity to help build a more sustainable future, one born of our common concern for the planet we share,” says Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “The innovations powering our environmental journey are not only good for the planet—they’ve helped us make our products more energy efficient and bring new sources of clean energy online around the world. Climate action can be the foundation for a new era of innovative potential, job creation and durable economic growth. With our commitment to carbon neutrality, we hope to be a ripple in the pond that creates a much larger change.”

Apple also plans to reduce emissions by 75 percent by 2030 and have solutions for carbon removal for the other 25 percent.

To take on this mission Apple has created a climate road map for the next decade. Some of Apple’s first steps include increasing the use of low carbon and recycled materials in its products, innovating product recycling and designing products to be more energy efficient.

The company is working with several companies to develop more engineering solutions. All iPhone, iPad, Mac and Apple Watch devices released in the past year are made with recycled content.

Apple decreased its carbon footprint by 4.3 million metric tons in 2019 and over the past 11 years, Apple has reduced the average energy needed for product use by 73 percent.

It isn’t just the products though, as Apple is working to find new ways to lower energy use at its corporate facilities.

Last year, Apple invested in energy efficiency upgrades to more than 6.4 million square feet of new and existing buildings, lowering electricity needs by nearly 20 percent.

Renewable energy is also important. Apple has commitments from more than 70 suppliers to use 100 percent renewable energy for production. Those commitments will avoid more than 14.3 million metric tons of CO2 each year.

Emissions will also be tackled through improvements in processing and materials by supporting a direct carbon-free aluminum smelting process with two aluminum suppliers.

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Source: Recycling Today
Apple commits to be 100 percent carbon neutral by 2030
<![CDATA[Apple, based in Cupertino, California, announced plans to become completely carbon neutral in the next decade. It will be across the entire business with the goal of every Apple device having net zero climate impact. “Businesses have a profound opportunity to help build a more sustainable future, one born of our common concern for the planet we share,” says Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “The innovations powering our environmental journey are not only good for the planet—they’ve helped us make our products more energy efficient and bring new sources of clean energy online around the world. Climate action can be the foundation for a new era of innovative potential, job creation and durable economic growth. With our commitment to carbon neutrality, we hope to be a ripple in the pond that creates a much larger change.”Apple also plans to reduce emissions by 75 percent by 2030 and have solutions for carbon removal for the other 25 percent. To take on this mission Apple has created a climate road map for the next decade. Some of Apple’s first steps include increasing the use of low carbon and recycled materials in its products, innovating product recycling and designing products to be more energy…

Carolina Recycling Association

Reusable Packaging Solutions for Subscription Services

With subscription services on the rise, especially in times when in-person shopping is a challenge, four service providers are seeking alternative, reusable packaging options from a Brooklyn, N.Y.-based designer and manufacturer. Returnity Innovatio
Waste360 – Waste and recycling information, events, commerce and education

Nestlé Waters North America Converts 3 More Water Brands to 100% Recycled Plastic

Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA) recently announced that three more of its US domestic still water brands have started to convert their packaging to 100% recycled plastic.

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Morgan Stanley to Become First US Bank to Publicly Disclose How Much Its Loans and Investments Contribute to Climate Change

Morgan Stanley will become the first US-based global bank to join the Partnership for Carbon Accounting Financials (PCAF) and its Steering Committee as part of the firm’s commitment to measuring and disclosing its approach to climate change risk and opportunity.

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3 easy ways to help recycle rechargeable batteries

Lowe’s and its customers have recycled more than 6 million pounds of rechargeable batteries since 2004
Each year, more and more people enjoy the convenience of rechargeable batteries. Just count the number of everyday devices you use that are powered …
Call2Recycle | United States

Coca-Cola European Partners Invests in Polyester Waste Recycling

Coca-Cola European Partners (CCEP) began funding Dutch startup CuRe Technology, which is developing a process for transforming difficult-to-recycle plastic polyester waste into high-quality recycled PET.

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